VIRAL DISEASES

  • Roseola
  • Fifth Disease
  • Rubella
  • Measles
  • Herpes Simplex
  • Shingles
  • Chicken Pox
  • Monkeypox
  • Smallpox
  • Warts

1. ROSEOLA

  • Exanthema subitum (meaning sudden rash), also referred to as roseola infantum (or rose rash of infants), sixth disease (as the sixth rash-causing childhood disease) and (confusingly) baby measles, or three-day fever, is a disease of children, generally under two years old,  although it has been known to occur in eighteen year olds, whose manifestations are usually limited to a transient rash  that occurs following a fever of about three day’s duration.

2. FIFTH DISEASE

  • Erythema infectiosum or fifth diseaseis one of several possible manifestations of infection by erythrovirus, previously calledparvovirus B19. The disease is also referred to as slapped cheek syndrome, slapcheek, slap face or slapped face.  In reference to the symptom of facial redness.

3.  RUBELLA

  • Rubella, commonly known as German measles, is a disease caused by the rubella virus. The name “rubella” is derived from Latin, meaning little red. Rubella is also known as German measles because the disease was first described by German physicians in the mid-eighteenth century. This disease is often mild and attacks often pass unnoticed. The disease can last one to three days. Children recover more quickly than adults. Infection of the mother by Rubella virus during pregnancy can be serious; if the mother is infected within the first 20 weeks of pregnancy, the child may be born with congenital rubella syndrome (CRS), which entails a range of serious incurable illnesses.

4. MEASLES

  • Measles, also known as morbilli, is an infection of the respiratory system caused by a virus, specifically a paramyxovirus of the genus Morbillivirus. Morbilliviruses, like other paramyxoviruses, are enveloped, single-stranded, negative-sense RNA viruses. Symptoms include fever, cough, runny nose, red eyes and a generalized, maculopapular, erythematous rash.

5. HERPES SIMPLEX

  • Herpes simplex  is a viral disease caused by both Herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and type 2 (HSV-2). Infection with the herpes virus is categorized into one of several distinct disorders based on the site of infection.Oral herpes, the visible symptoms of which are colloquially called cold sores or fever blisters, is an infection of the face or mouth. Oral herpes is the most common form of infection. Genital herpes, known simply as herpes, is the second most common form of herpes. Other disorders such as herpetic whitlow, herpes gladiatorum, ocular herpes (keratitis), cerebral herpes infection encephalitis,Mollaret’s meningitis, neonatal herpes, and possibly Bell’s palsy are all caused by herpes simplex viruses.

6.  SHINGLES

  • Herpes zoster (or simply zoster), commonly known as shingles and also known as zona, is a viral disease characterized by a painfulskin rash with blisters in a limited area on one side of the body, often in a stripe. The initial infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV) causes the acute (short-lived) illness chickenpox which generally occurs in children and young people. Once an episode of chickenpox has resolved, the virus is not eliminated from the body but can go on to cause shingles—an illness with very different symptoms—often many years after the initial infection.

7. CHICKEN POX

  • Chickenpox (or chicken pox) is a highly contagious illness caused by primary infection with varicella zoster virus (VZV). It usually starts with vesicular skin rash mainly on the body and head rather than at the periphery and becomes itchy, raw pockmarks, which mostly heal without scarring. On examination, the observer typically finds lesions at various stages of healing.

8. MONKEYPOX

  • Monkeypox is an exotic infectious disease caused by the monkeypox virus. The disease was first identified in laboratory monkeys, hence its name, but in its natural state it seems to infect rodents more often than primates. Human monkeypox is a zoonoticviral disease that occurs primarily in remote villages of Central and West Africa in proximity totropical rainforests where there is more frequent contact with infected animals. Monkeypox is usually transmitted to humans fromrodents, pets, and primates through contact with the animal’s blood or through a bite.

9. SMALLPOX

  • There are two clinical forms of smallpox. Variola major is the severe and most common form, with a more extensive rash and higher fever. Variola minor is a less common presentation, and a much less severe disease, with historical death rates of 1% or less. Subclinical (asymptomatic) infections with variola virus have been noted, but are not common. In addition, a form called variola sine eruptione (smallpox without rash) is seen generally in vaccinated persons. This form is marked by a fever that occurs after the usual incubation period and can be confirmed only by antibody studies or, rarely, by virus isolation.

10. WARTS

  • wart is generally a small, rough growth, typically on a human’s hands or feet but often other locations, that can resemble a cauliflower or a solid blister. They are caused by a viral infection, specifically by one of the many types of human papillomavirus. There are as many as 10 varieties of warts, the most common considered to be mostly harmless. It is possible to get warts from others; they are contagious and usually enter the body in an area of broken skin. They typically disappear after a few months but can last for years and can recur.
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